Why vote no? Supporters of Iowa City's $191 Million school bond are not telling the full truth.

Current Plan Endangers Hills Elementary

The Hills community has good reason to worry about the district’s commitment to that school—especially since the district has floated multiple proposals to close Hills in recent years.

Why The School Bond Proposal is NOT the Best Option

I have never voted against a school bond before, but the $191 million bond before voters Sept. 12 deserves to be defeated.

'Why I don’t support the bond proposal'

Researched and published by Iowa City School Board member Chris Liebig: “Our recent ten-year enrollment projections don’t come anywhere close to supporting the amount of capacity the plan would build.”

Factcheck: 'Yes' Campaign Stretching the Facts

They are trying to hide the facts about where their money comes from. The truth is that about 90 percent of the “Yes” campaign’s money comes from a small group of businesses.

'Yes' Group Brings Big Money to Local Politics

The campaign supporting the school bond is spending an enormous amount on local politics – reportedly trying to raise $200,000 or more. The Press-Citizen reports, “developers who could profit from the project have donated.”

NUMBERS: Iowa City School Bond is Too Big

School administrators plan to build more new buildings and expansions than we need – ten years from now, our schools will have nearly 2,000 unfilled seats across the district.

A Closer Look at ICCSD's Debt Capacity

Borrowing money using debt financing needs to make sense not just for one’s school district and all of the outsiders who might financially benefit, but also make sense for a voter’s individual circumstances.

State Ethics Complaint Filed Against ICCSD Principal

We believe Mr. Kibby’s use of ICCSD’s email server violates certain provisions of the Administrative Code of Iowa.

State Ethics Complaint Filed Against ICCSD Principal

We believe Mr. Kibby’s use of ICCSD’s email server violates certain provisions of the Administrative Code of Iowa.

The True Cost of Iowa City’s Multi-Million $ Debt Plan

This bond, plus interest on the five bonds to be sold over the course of 10 years, will cost district taxpayers anywhere from $241 million to $266 million, with the last bond being paid off in 2042.

Yates: 'The district administration cannot be trusted'

Former School Board member Tom Yates writes: “There is nothing about special education, or any significant mention of vocational/career education, two areas of education about which the district has either been in serious legal trouble, or basically done away with.”

Let the public vote on tearing down Hoover

Researched and published by Iowa City School Board member Chris Liebig: “There is a long list of reasons why the district’s plans for Hoover are bad policy.”

Follow the Money on the $191 Million School Bond

Published on Iowa City Patch, May 2017: “When you follow the money on who’s supporting a YES vote on the $191 million school bond, it’s easy to see whose financial interests are at stake. Hint: it’s not about the kids.”

DeProsse & Dieterle: 'Don't be misled.'

Published in the Iowa City Press-Citizen, June 2017: ” Iowa City Community School District’s proposed $191.5 million bond issue — the largest ever in Iowa — is not binding. There is no legal obligation to do all projects listed.”

How Much Does a $191 Million Bond Really Cost?

Can ICCSD truly confirm yet what the $191.525 million dollar bond referendum with interest will cost if approved by voters? No. There are lots of factors that impact the costs of bonds.

How Much Does a $191 Million Bond Really Cost?

Can ICCSD truly confirm yet what the $191.525 million dollar bond referendum with interest will cost if approved by voters? No. There are lots of factors that impact the costs of bonds.

The Choice is not Between THIS BOND or NOTHING

First priority projects should include air-conditioning, and rehab to older, urban core schools like Longfellow and Mann, and upgrading Special Education facilities.

ICCSD Graduate Explains 'No' Vote

Published in the Press-Citizen, June 2017: “Voters should not allow themselves to become rubber stamps for ICCSD leadership. Vote no to show them we demand more than excessively vague promises, veiled in compassion.”

District Enrollment Numbers Don't Add Up

Published in the Press-Citizen, March 2017: “The bond proposal ignores the central problem now facing the district, which is the poor educational outcome provided to many of our students.”

"Too Aggressive & Too Pricey"

Published in The Gazette, April 2017: “It’s unfortunate that the immediately necessary upgrades and expansions in the facilities plan are tied to the superfluous projects.”